Posts filed under ‘Contributions’

May 1, 2008 (Vol. 14, No. 13) – Contributions

Library News from 100 Years Ago

The human race is born in sin and nurtured in carelessness. If anyone doubts this he has only to notice how many fines the Portland public library has collected in one year for books kept overtime and he will doubt no longer. The sum total of these delinquencies amounts to more than 28,000 days, which falls barely short of 77 years. The time thus sinfully passed in keeping books that other people want to read hidden away in bath tubs and coal scuttles if it were concentrated in two or three single lives might do wonders. Twenty years of it might be spent by another Gibbon in writing another Decline and fall, 20 more by some younger Spencer in working out a new and better theory of evolution , and still there would remain 37 years for a genius greater than either of these to employ in solving the problems of human misery and teaching us all how to be healthy and happy. What a world it might be if nobody kept library books longer than the rules allow!

Quoted from The Oregonian.  Appearing in the June 1908 Public Libraries. p 240

Library News from 100 Years Ago comes courtesy of the progressive bound periodicals lending policy of Oregon State University.

Tony Greiner, tony_greiner@hotmail.com

May 2, 2008 at 8:25 am Leave a comment

April 1, 2008 (Vol. 14, No. 11) – Contributions

Library News from 1908

From the 1908 edition of “Public Libraries.”

“Library Copyright League.”

A report from W. P. Cutter, who appeared before the committee on patents in Congress the last of March, states that it was very evident at the time that the attitude of the publishers toward the librarians had somewhat changed and equally evident that the committee’s attitude toward the publishers had changed also.

The chairman of the committee announced during the progress of the hearing that they would sanction no legislation which would give control over the resale of books once sold by the publishers, and that they were working to protect the public to the fullest extent.

The chairman of the Senate committee stated that the Copyright league need only ask for what the libraries wanted, for it was almost certain that anything opposed by the libraries would not receive favorable consideration by the committee, and even if it did, no measure limiting their privileges could be passed by either the House or the Senate.”

[This was concerning an effort by publishers to keep libraries from buying used books.] (May 1908, p 179)

++++

Charles W. Smith, of the University of Washington library, has prepared an expansion of the Dewey decimal classification for the history of the Pacific Northwest. It has been reprinted in pamphlet form at the request of the libraries in that locality. It is not expected that its field of usefulness will extend outside of the region of Old Oregon, but it covers that territory very completely.

(May 1908, p 180)

+++++

Wanted-A Librarian-A library in a northern Michigan community, which is largely engaged in mining and smelting iron ore, wants a librarian. The duties assigned to the librarian in this place partake, very largely, of the nature of the work that is done in settlements. There are two classes of people in the town, those connected with the works and those who own the works. The first are largely foreigners, Poles and Bohemians. The librarian will be expected to organize improvement circles, girls’ clubs, sewing classes and whatever means may be used to give the young people of the place ambitious ideas of good living, friendliness and good feeling. The salary to being with is $75 a month. The only drawback to the position is the lack of facilities for comfortable living.

(May 1908, p 186)

This column is made possible by the forward-thinking lending policy of the University of Oregon library, which allows its bound periodicals to be borrowed via SUMMIT.

Tony Greiner tony_greiner@hotmail.com

April 2, 2008 at 2:27 pm Leave a comment

March 15, 2008 (Vol. 14, No. 10) – Contributions

LIBRARY NEWZ FROM 1908

“A Current event club has been organized by Jessie H. Millard, of the children’s department of the Public Library, Portland, Ore. A recent exhibition of wireless telegraphy held by this club aroused so much interest that a scientific club was organized.”  ( Public Libraries, February 1908, p 72)

++++

“The woman who takes out of the public or subscription library a novel a day is only suffering from the perversion of an appetite which in its normal state is beneficial. It is possible that her husband does not read enough  for amusement, that his horizon is narrowed, his sympathies stunted by the lack of that very influence which, in excess, unfits his wife for the realities an duties of everyday existence. It came as a surprise to many to learn from Tennyson’s Life that the author of In Memoriam was a great novel reader. But certainly in his case the novel produced no weakening of the mental fiber.”

(“Lest we Forget: In the multitude of books, the few great books.”

Harry Lyman Koopman, librarian, Brown University. Public Libraries, April 1908, p 119.)

+++++

A street directory has been completed for the Public library of District of Columbia. This is a locality index of registered borrowers. By it the names of all persons residing oat the same street number are brought together on one card, whether or not they have the same surname. By means of this index, on receipt of the daily notices from the district health officer of new cases of contagious diseases it is possible to know all registered borrowers who have been exposed to infection and temporarily to withdraw privileges and enforce either disinfection or destruction of books in their hands.” (Public Libraries, April, 1908, p 151)

+++

“Library news from1908 is brought to you courtesy of the University of Oregon Library’s progressive policy of circulating bound periodicals through Summit.

Tony Greiner, the compiler, can be reached at tony_greiner@hotmail.com

March 17, 2008 at 10:48 am Leave a comment

Mar. 1, 2008 (Vol. 14, No. 9) – Contributions

*** LIBRARY NEWZ FROM THE PAST

Taken from “Public Libraries”, Volume 11, 1906.

Susan B. Anthony has offered copies of all her books on the suffrage question to the Oregon library commission for the traveling libraries of  the state. (p40)

Cornelia Marvin, secretary of the Oregon commission library, has sent out a list of  wholesome juvenile books, with prices, for  holiday trade and for home libraries, together with some excellent facts about libraries. (p40)

The forty-second annual report of the Library association of Portland, Ore. gives an increase in the circulation in the library, notwithstanding the distraction of the Fair. The quality of books read has improved, the fiction per cent being on the decline; it is now less than 62 per cent. The circulation in the children’s department was 40,650V and through the schools, 9441V. The story telling is given as the chief cause of the decrease in fiction reading in this department, having dropped from 59 to 52 per cent. 10,914V. were prepared for the shelves and 7629 were cataloged. The work of the branches continues to grow. Thirteen distributing stations are in active work. (p475)

From “Public Libraries” Vol 13,  (1908)

Courtesy of the University of Oregon’s willingness to lend bound periodicals via SUMMIT.

“We should look closely after the books we put into the hands of our children. The characteristics of eighteenth century fiction are summed up in the following:

            Maria so attentive grew,

                        So Thoughtful and Polite;

            Her friends admired and loved her  too,

                        For all she did was right.

Perhaps the pendulum has swung a little too far the other way when we think of the numerous calls for “Peck’s Bad Boy,” of the deep interest in Huckleberry Finn, Tom Sawyer and other realistic tales. Somewhere between these two extremes, we must find the books that are suitable for our boys and girls and will hold their interest.”

“In regards to book agents, there is only one rule, never to be violated, and that is, buy nothing whatever from an agent.”

-From a talk by Mrs. Sara Judd Greenman of the

Kansas City Kansas Public Library. (January, 1908 p 25.)

News from the past is brought to you by Tony Greiner, who is getting kind of long in the tooth himself. tony_greiner@hotmail.com

March 2, 2008 at 1:31 am Leave a comment

Feb. 15, 2008 (Vol. 14, No. 8) – Contributions

Library Newz from the Past

Taken from “Public Libraries”, Volume 11, 1906.

Susan B. Anthony has offered copies of all her books on the suffrage question to the Oregon library commission for the traveling libraries of  the state. (p40)

Cornelia Marvin, secretary of the Oregon commission library, has sent out a list of  wholesome juvenile books, with prices, for  holiday trade and for home libraries, together with some excellent facts about libraries. (p40)

The forty-second annual report of the Library association of Portland, Ore. gives an increase in the circulation in the library, notwithstanding the distraction of the Fair. The quality of books read has improved, the fiction per cent being on the decline; it is now less than 62 per cent. The circulation in the children’s department was 40,650V and through the schools, 9441V. The story telling is given as the chief cause of the decrease in fiction reading in this department, having dropped from 59 to 52 per cent. 10,914V. were prepared for the shelves and 7629 were cataloged. The work of the branches continues to grow. Thirteen distributing stations are in active work. (p475)

From “Public Libraries” Vol 13,  (1908)

Courtesy of the University of Oregon’s willingness to lend bound periodicals via SUMMIT.

“We should look closely after the books we put into the hands of our children. The characteristics of eighteenth century fiction are summed up in the following:

           Maria so attentive grew,

                        So Thoughtful and Polite;

            Her friends admired and loved her  too,

                        For all she did was right.

Perhaps the pendulum has swung a little too far the other way when we think of the numerous calls for “Peck’s Bad Boy,” of the deep interest in Huckleberry Finn, Tom Sawyer and other realistic tales. Somewhere between these two extremes, we must find the books that are suitable for our boys and girls and will hold their interest.”

“In regards to book agents, there is only one rule, never to be violated, and that is, buy nothing whatever from an agent.”

-From a talk by Mrs. Sara Judd Greenman of the Kansas City Kansas Public Library. (January, 1908 p 25.)

News from the past is brought to you by Tony Greiner, who is getting kind of long in the tooth himself. tony_greiner@hotmail.com

February 15, 2008 at 2:43 pm Leave a comment

September 15, 2007 (Vol. 13, No. 22) – Contributions

Oregon Books Reviewed by Tony Greiner

*Neil, Robert Dean. Clarence Darrow’s Unlikely Friend: Clarence True Wilson: Debaters but Always Friends. Portland, OR: Spirit Press, 2007. ISBN 1893075338

The slightly confusing title refers to an Oregonian, Clarence True Wilson, who lived for awhile in Oregon, was a prohibitionist, and opposed lawyer and “wet” advocate Clarence Darrow in a series of debates on the topic across the country. History is a funny thing: If prohibition had worked, Wilson would perhaps be regarded as a major reformer in our history. Now Wilson is forgotten, and Darrow is remembered mostly in a fictionalized version in the play and movie, “Inherit the Wind.”

But for us, the point is that Wilson was a prominent Methodist who lived in Portland during the prohibition years and this account (really a biography of Wilson) covers those years and all of Wilson’s life. The author, another Methodist preacher, lives in Oregon, and has spent a good part of his career in counseling alcoholics. However, the book has problems. Among these are the lack of an index, or a bibliography, and endnotes that are vague enough to cite things such as “Wilson Papers” without giving a box number or even a location of those papers. (How I wish there was more detail in the citation “Report of the Flying Squadron.”) But, this book is as good as we are likely to get until someone writes a PhD dissertation. For our largest libraries. Paperback, 220 pages, endnotes but no index.

Some photos. Spirit Press, Portland. http://www.spiritpress.org. 2007. $17

*Kohl, David Grant. A Curious and Peculiar People: A History of the Metropolitan Community Church in Portland and the Sexual Minority Communities of Northwest Oregon. Portland, OR: Spirit Press, 2006. ISBN 1893075540

This book, also from Spirit Press, has won the Silver Medal from the Independent Publisher’s Association. I reviewed it last year, but a reminder: This is much more than a church history, as it is also a history of homosexuals (mostly male) in Portland im the last century. Valuable for almost all of our colleges.

*Wuerthner, George. Wildfire: A Century of Failed Forest Policy. Sausalito, CA: Foundation for Deep Ecology by arrangement with Island Press, 2006. ISBN 159726069X

The title tells you about the book. It is a large and heavy illustrated coffee-table type book, interspersed with essays from various people (including former Oregon Congressman Les AuCoin) about how the fire-suppression policies of the last 100 years have been bad news ecologically and economically. Specific essays include one on the Klamath-Siskiyou region and salvage logging. The huge size (14 by 14, over 300 pages), and weight (more than 5 pounds) is unfortunate, as it makes it unlikely to be picked up (much less read) by anyone interested in the topic. Fortunately, “selected essays” from the book were printed in a more readable format, under the name Wildfire Reader. If you want some material on this topic, buy the reader. The picture book I saw is only for true believers who want to display their ideology. I didn’t see the Reader, but Wildfire has an index and bibliography.

Tony Greiner, tony_greiner@hotmail.com

September 14, 2007 at 11:20 am Leave a comment


Categories

Recent Posts

Feeds


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.